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The Sheffield culture guide written by in-the-know locals

Integrate That is a podcast focussing on different issues around a refugee’s life in the UK (and Europe).

"We take the listener through some of the reality of trying and making a life in a foreign country. Although some stories are grim - it is generally happy and sarcastic. We refugees tend to make fun of our new daily lives and the systems that we have to adapt to. This is a challenge that we would like to open a listener to - life can be funny. In this narrative, we don’t have a choice about travelling, or seeing our families, or about the jobs that we do."

Hosted by Abdulwahab Tahhan, a researcher and occasionally a standup comedian, raised in Aleppo, Syria and based in London. He's currently doing this pilot podcast to give a voice to the refugees and allow them to own the narrative of their stories. He's also working on a series of videos on youtube about being a refugee.

Launching online during Migration Matters 15–20 June – listen below.

Free – donations welcome.

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