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The Sheffield culture guide written by in-the-know locals

Eddy Dreadnought

Eddy's incredible studio is full of curious found objects and piles of intriguing books. There, he works on all kinds of creative projects, turning his research into films and pamphlets, and his questions and ideas into conceptual sculptures and drawings. One such contemplative project is the Dawn Chorus, a collaboration between Eddy and artists situated around the country who each rise early on assigned dates to record their observations of the rising dawn over the medium of Twitter. Pay a visit to Eddy's studio at the next Yorkshire Artspace Open Studios weekend, and read on to get to know him better.

How would you describe your work?
I use a variety of methods: performance, writing, drawing, video, photography, and collecting found objects. Often my work is based on significant research. Some of it is collaborative. I aim to ask questions about the world around us, but open questions posed in a sensory, poetic way. I favour absurdist personification – like my planned performance of lecturing a bee colony on republicanism and gender equality.

What inspires you?
I am particularly interested in horizontal as opposed to hierarchical structure. Subjects I tend to come back to are the recession, the impulse to seek oblivion and denial, and the history of cultural revolutions, particularly in Russia, China, and the English Civil War. I have also done several projects in Sheffield centre, Upperthorpe and Neepsend, and working out of Parson Cross has highlighted for me the issues raised by community art, and the relevance of contemporary art to working class areas.

What do you love about Sheffield?
The nearness of the Peak District, the rich industrial and militant history, the busy art scene, the social mix, Bragazzi’s coffee.

What would you do to improve the city?
Reduce the social inequality between different areas, celebrate the completely different architectural styles of all adjacent buildings in the centre, and bring back the "People’s Republic Of South Yorkshire".

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