This website uses cookies. Read more about our cookie/privacy policy.

Accept and Close

The Sheffield culture guide written by in-the-know locals

The Art House pottery tutorials

The Art House is a creative hub based in Sheffield city centre, home to a cafe, studios, galleries and workshop rooms. Its emphasis is on providing a safe and inclusive space for "people who are normally excluded and marginalised and most unable to discover their creativity" – helping people to improve their wellbeing through creative arts.

As a charity, the Art House usually funds its work with vulnerable people through public art classes. To make up for its lack of income during lockdown, the venue is currently running a fundraising campaign – donate online. Donate a minimum of £10 and you'll get a unique pot made in the Art House pottery workshop and kiln!

See their series of pottery tutorials below to learn how to knead and prepare clay, how to centre clay on a pottery wheel, and the basic stages of throwing a straight-sided cylindrical form on the wheel.

Kneading and preparing clay

How to centre clay

Look out for more video tutorials and online art classes coming soon!

Read more about the Art House.

You might also like...

Game Makers

Ever played a game and thought 'I want to make this!'? Well now is your chance! Follow this guide from the National Videogame Museum and dip your toes into game creation using free children's programming language Scratch.

CMC Keynote Panel: Black Lives Matter

The opening keynote panel for Children's Media Conference 2020 considers the implications of the worldwide movement for change on the children’s media audience and industry.

Small Pleasures Project: Give us a Gif

A digital patchwork stemming from the theme of small pleasures during these uncertain times, made up of 64 gifs sent in from Sheffield and around the world!

Dr Iona Hine – Exile and Precarity in the 1930s: the Case of H.W. Cassirer

An insightful look at exiled German Jewish academic Heinrich Walter Cassirer, stripped of his position by Hitler's first anti-Jewish law. Dr Iona Hine reconstructs the precarious experiences of a migrant academic in 1930s Britain.